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Ireland Virtual Reality

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Ireland is an island in the North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George’s Channel. Ireland is the second-largest island of the British Isles, the third-largest in Europe, and the twentieth-largest on Earth.

The Spire of Dublin stands 150 meters tall (about 394 feet). This iconic structure was commissioned as a celebratory symbol of Dublin entering the new millennium. The project was completed in 2003 amidst mixed feelings from the public, many of whom saw the multimillion dollar price tag as exorbitant. The structure has quite a collection of nicknames, most reference the shape as well as the economic hardships the area once suffered, including The Spike, The Binge Syringe, The Stiletto in the Ghetto, The Nail in the Pale, The Pin in the Bin… use your imagination for the rest.

O’Connell Street is Dublin’s main thoroughfare. It measures 49 m (54 yds) in width at its southern end, 46 m (50 yds) at the north, and is 500 m (547 yds) in length. During the 17th century, it was a narrow street known as Drogheda Street (named after Henry Moore, Earl of Drogheda). It was widened, and renamed ‘Sackville Street’ (named after Lionel Sackville, 1st Duke of Dorset) in the late 1700s until 1924, when it was renamed in honour of Daniel O’Connell, a nationalist leader of the early 19th century, whose statue stands at the lower end of the street, facing O’Connell Bridge.

Located in the heart of Dublin city, O’Connell Street forms part of a grand thoroughfare created in the 18th century that runs through the centre of the capital, O’Connell Bridge, Westmoreland Street, College Green and Dame Street, terminating at City Hall and Dublin Castle. Situated just north of the River Liffey, the street has a fine axial positioning, running close to a north-south orientation. Lined with many handsome buildings, O’Connell Street is the most monumental of Dublin’s commercial streets, having been largely rebuilt in the early 20th century following extensive destruction in the struggle for Irish independence and subsequent civil war. It has the air of an imposing 1920s boulevard, with signature stone-faced neoclassical buildings such as Clerys department store complemented by the more subtle grain of elegant bank and retail premises. O’Connell Street Upper, by contrast, retains something of its original 18th-century character, with the western side conforming to original plot widths and some original fabric still intact.

Dunamase or The Rock of Dunamase (Irish: Dún Másc” fort of Másc”) is a rocky outcrop in the townland of Park or Dunamase in County Laois.The rock, 46 metres (151 ft) above a flat plain, has the ruins of Dunamase Castle, a defensive stronghold dating from the early Hiberno-Norman period with a view across to the Slieve Bloom Mountains. It is near the N80 road between the towns of Portlaoise and Stradbally.
Archeological excavations in the 1990s demonstrated that the Rock was first settled in the 9th century when a hill fort or dún was constructed on the site. The first known settlement on the rock was Dun Masc, or Masc’s Fort, an early Christian settlement that was pillaged in 842 by the Vikings. In 845 the Vikings of Dublin attacked the site and the abbot of Terryglass, Aed son of Dub dá Chrích, was killed there.There is no clear evidence of 10th–11th-century occupation.

Dublin Castle off Dame Street, Dublin, Ireland, was until 1922 the seat of the United Kingdom government’s administration in Ireland and is now a major Irish government complex. Most of it dates from the 18th century, though a castle has stood on the site since the days of King John, the first Lord of Ireland. The Castle served as the seat of English, then later British government of Ireland under the Lordship of Ireland (1171–1541), the Kingdom of Ireland (1541–1800), and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (1800–1922).

The castle today is a major tourist attraction and conferencing destination. The building is also used for State dinners (the most recent being for Queen Elizabeth II in 2011) and most significantly, the inauguration of the presidents of Ireland.

 

 

 

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